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ReSPECT for patients, parents, partners and families

ReSPECT stands for Recommended Summary Plan for Emergency Care and Treatment. It is about creating a personalised recommendation for someone’s clinical care in emergency situations where they are not able to make decisions or express their wishes.

We are implementing the ReSPECT process across the West of England to encourage people to have conversations about advance care planning. The aim is that everyone should receive the best possible treatment for their individual situation.

The process consists of the person in question having conversations with trained healthcare professionals. These conversations often take place over several meetings to allow families and carers to be involved. This results in a completed ReSPECT form that details the types of care and treatment they would or would not want to be considered for in an emergency.

ReSPECT will also record a Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) decision if one has been made. However, ReSPECT is about much wider care preferences and is equally applicable to patients for whom resuscitation is appropriate.

ReSPECT can be used for any age (with appropriate parental involvement for children and young people). However, in the first instance in our region our focus is on adult patients. Information on ReSPECT for young people and parents is available on the ReSPECT process website.

Information in the media

Death and dying are taboo subjects, and it can be hard to start a conversation.

On BBC Radio 4 Joan Bakewell and her panel discuss death and dying on the programme We Need to Talk About Death. They explore the choices open to us and confronting the questions we fear the most. The episode named My Dying Wishes in series 3 discussed the ReSPECT process and is available to listen and download here (from 43 minutes).

Other episodes from We Need to Talk About Death are available to listen and download.

Recommended books

  • Our recommended read is With the End in Mind: How to Live and Die Well by Kathryn Mannix. In her book, palliative medicine pioneer Dr Kathryn Mannix explores death through a series of beautifully crafted stories taken from nearly four decades of clinical practice. She makes a compelling case for the therapeutic power of approaching death with openness, clarity and understanding.
    Read an extract and an interview with the author (from 12 minutes).
  • Starting the Conversation. This guide created by the charity Compassion in Dying aims to support you to talk about your wishes for care and treatment with your family, friends and doctor.

On Twitter

Peer Support workers @KnightonStar & @MyNamesNaomi created this poem and illustration for #ReSPECTworcestershire

 ReSPECT poem